everythingcentralasia:

Paintings by an Uzbek artist, Saira Keltaeva.

Saira Keltaeva was born on 16 May 1961 in Kumyshkan, Tashkent region, Uzbek SSR. In 1979 Saira Keltaeva graduated from the National Music Art School, boarding arts class on easel painting, she was taught under the guidance of Art teacher A.P.Perova - national artist of Uzbekistan. The same year she entered Theatre and Art Institute in Tashkent. She currently lives and works in Tashkent. Saira Keltaeva is a member of the Creative Union of Artists at the Academy of Arts of Uzbekistan. Beautiful and colorful female asians look more fairies in the artist’s oil paintings. Saira’s works are exhibited in museums and Art Galleries, as well as in private collections in Korea, China, Turkey, Germany, Holland, Italy, France and the United States. She currently lives and works in Tashkent.

(via oradianto)

Anonymous Asked:
Hello! I feel a bit silly for asking but I am really interested to know what Anti-Genius is / all about. Somehow I feel like I should just know, but I don't. Love your horoscopes, by the by.

therumpus:

doskapozora:

Oh anon I’m glad you asked!! I worry that “anti genius” is really easily interpreted to mean something totally different than what I’m trying to do, and I am grateful for the opportunity to keep being a broken record about it!

First, to be clear, Anti-Genius is not anti art! Not anti-good art, not anti-difficult art, not anti-complicated art. Not, as all these litbros insist on believing, about reducing great literature to a sad flat landscape of “good” and “bad” people. It’s not about being “offended” by “characters i don’t like,” it’s not about wanting to only read “viewpoints that I agree with.” (I trust that you know this, anon, but I think probably it’s an important thing to get out of the way. Ok!!). 

The tag has started to sprawl a little bit, but the original and most basic point of Anti-Genius is that producing great art does not excuse a person from the responsibilities of being human. The most basic point of Anti-Genius is that good literature is the most important thing in the world to me BUT STILL people are more important. 
I went to a liberal arts college full of brainy social justice-obsessed weirdos and even then, in one of the first lit classes I took, we spent the entire semester discussing whether or not The Artist is of a fundamentally different breed than the regular person. Liiiiiike, truly, I cannot believe that is even a question. The artist is a human just like the rest of us. The poet is a human just like the rest of us. Same as the movie actor, same as the Wall Street banker, same as the pro football player, I don’t care. This is not to say that “we’re all human let’s get along!” but rather that we all live in a difficult world, and we all need to do the best we can to live kind and just and moral lives, and having a cool job does not excuse you from this. This is like so basic, it’s so uncool to say. My internalized poststructuralist theorist is cackling and groaning at me right now, my internalized Cool Brooklyn self is cringing so hard, I don’t care, here we are. 
Not saying that nobody should consume art by anyone who is a “bad person,” etc etc etc. We all have our own complicated moral arithmetic to do, to determine what we’ll ignore, what we’ll let go, what we’ll forgive. I will not watch a movie by Woody Allen but I still love David Foster Wallace. It’s not easy and I’m not pure but like, but like
I once went to a comedy show at UCB where Donald Glover did a joke about Michael Jackson, about how liiiiike wellllll maybe a kid or two got abused but Thriller was worth it. Anti-Genius means fuckkkkkk that. Anti-Genius means that the wives matter, the girlfriends matter, the kids matter, what is even the point, otherwise. Anti-Genius means that art is the most important thing there is but it is never that important. 

No Madame Clairevoyant today. (She is traveling.) Instead, however, we offer her thoughts on “ANTI-GENIUS.”

ghanailoveyou:

Abdul Ndadi is an animator from Ghana and a graduate from the School of Visual Arts, NY class of 2013.  He’s created an animation film entitled Orisha’s Journey (2014) which will be shown at the Hiroshima International Animation Festival in Japan (21st August 2014 - 25th August 2014).

Orisha’s Journey is a fantasy tale of a girl’s journey through the spirit world (‘Orisha’ denotes a spirit in Nigerian Yoruba cosmology), who must learn about the importance of remembering one’s roots. The film, set in a mysterious walking forest, explores the power of a child’s imagination and the deep meanings and manifestations of Africa.

The film is based on African folklore. I want to show another side to Africa besides safaris, so I explore different aspects of different countries around Africa in order to give the viewer a pan-African experience. It’s important to me that Africans feel that no matter where they’re from, they’re part of my film. In the West, there is not a lot of exposure to real Africans  — most people only go as far as The Lion King.  I want to take people farther, to create a deeper meaning. There is a word in Ghanaian: “Sankofa” – it means to return that which was lost. It is a symbol for not forgetting your roots and learning from the past. It is said that a tree without roots cannot stand. - Abdul Ndadi

(via pedazititos)

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Feta Cheese Panna Cotta With Red Quinoa, Cucumber, & Yogurt Soup. ✅ By - @yosi77 ✅
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chefsofinstagram:

Feta Cheese Panna Cotta With Red Quinoa, Cucumber, & Yogurt Soup. ✅ By - @yosi77 ✅

#ChefsOfInstagram #ChefHeart

JOIN US ON FACEBOOK at http://Facebook.com/ChefsOfInstagram

everythingcentralasia:

Paintings by Akmal Nur.

"There is a God-shaped hole in the human soul and each man fills it as he can”. -A.N
Akmal Nur (Nuriddinov) one of the best-known artists of Uzbekistan during his 35–year-old career has won his spurs both in Uzbekistan and abroad. He was born in 1959 in Namangan city (Uzbekistan). Having graduated from the Republican Art School named after P. Benkov in 1978 and the Tashkent State Institute of Arts named after M. Uygur in 1984 he started his work mastering his artistry in the best Tashkent arts studios. In 1997 Akmal Nur became an academician, active member of the Academy of Arts of Uzbekistan. And in 2003 he was awarded the title of People’s Artist of Uzbekistan. (x)

(via oradianto)