fashioninhistory:

Evening Dress
Madame Grès
1967
The collections of Madame Grès were prized for the pleated silk jersey gowns that ended each of her shows. With their himation-like draped swags, these designs are a relaxed version of the fine dense pleating that generally covers her fitted, highly structured bodices. The technical virtuosity incorporated in the draping is revealed only on close study of this example. The swags are both continuous and unbroken panels of fabric that incorporate the right fronts and backs of the gown. In her neoclassicism, Grès conformed to the antique notion of uninterrupted lengths of cloth, stitched but not cut into shape. From her earliest work, Grès introduced windows onto the body with cutouts that bared the back and midriff. She created a fissured shoulder, consistent with her own practice and resonant of the split shoulderlines of antique chitons.

fashioninhistory:

Evening Dress

Madame Grès

1967

The collections of Madame Grès were prized for the pleated silk jersey gowns that ended each of her shows. With their himation-like draped swags, these designs are a relaxed version of the fine dense pleating that generally covers her fitted, highly structured bodices. The technical virtuosity incorporated in the draping is revealed only on close study of this example. The swags are both continuous and unbroken panels of fabric that incorporate the right fronts and backs of the gown. In her neoclassicism, Grès conformed to the antique notion of uninterrupted lengths of cloth, stitched but not cut into shape. From her earliest work, Grès introduced windows onto the body with cutouts that bared the back and midriff. She created a fissured shoulder, consistent with her own practice and resonant of the split shoulderlines of antique chitons.

"Now, to pry into roots, to finger slime,
To stare, big-eyed Narcissus, into some spring
Is beneath all adult dignity. I rhyme
To see myself, to set the darkness echoing."

Seamus Heaney would have been 75 years old this month. We’re remembering him by looking at the language of his first full-length collection, Death of a Naturalist. (via oupacademic)

mymodernmet:

Lifestyle photographer Grace Chon recently turned the camera on her 10-month-old baby Jasper and their 7-year-old rescue dog Zoey, putting them side-by-side in the some of the most adorable portraits ever.

(via takefour)

yourllbeanboyfriend:

Liam and I basked in the spring sun, the perfect weather to spend a Saturday in the yard, figuring out our gardening schedule for the year.

yourllbeanboyfriend:

Liam and I basked in the spring sun, the perfect weather to spend a Saturday in the yard, figuring out our gardening schedule for the year.

redbubble:

It’s World Book Day! Visit the Redbubble blog  where our artists have beautifully translated a love for literature into a visual format. Peruse our library collection of book artwork and get amped to pick up your favorite book.http://bit.ly/1iat9mn
above: 
"She-Read" by wytrab8

redbubble:

It’s World Book Day! Visit the Redbubble blog  where our artists have beautifully translated a love for literature into a visual format. Peruse our library collection of book artwork and get amped to pick up your favorite book.
http://bit.ly/1iat9mn

above: 

"She-Read" by wytrab8

(via bookporn)

ladiesagainsthumanity:

Although do the witches only talk about Macbeth? Do Ophelia and Gertrude only talk about Hamlet? Does the Nurse have a last name?? Goddamnit.

ladiesagainsthumanity:

Although do the witches only talk about Macbeth? Do Ophelia and Gertrude only talk about Hamlet? Does the Nurse have a last name?? Goddamnit.

girlwithalessonplan:

theatlantic:

Why Shakespeare Belongs in Prison

It’s his 450th birthday, and The Bard has never appealed to a wider or more diverse audience. American higher-ed English departments may be teaching him less than they used to, but the Internet and modern film and TV interpretations have helped democratize appreciation of his works around the world. That’s only fitting: In Shakespeare’s era, the royalty in attendance at his productions was joined by crowds of commoners called “groundlings” and “stinkards” who paid a penny to stand in the pit, sweltering in the heat, while even more milled about outside. 
There’s one “commoner” population to whom Shakespeare can hold special significance: convicts. Recent decades have seen a proliferation of programs in prisons, jails, and juvenile detention centers meant to introduce the accused to works found in the Folios and Quartos. While arts outreach efforts in correctional environments are nothing new, any diehard Shakespearean might recognize how his works appeal uniquely to the criminally accused, one of society’s most marginalized populations.
Laura Bates, author of Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary With the Bard, described teaching the plays in a super-max facility housing the most violent criminals in the system in an interview last year with NPR. The book’s title comes from the words of one inmate, convicted of murder as a teenager and placed in solitary confinement for years.
“The day that I came knocking on his cell door,” Bates explained, “his life had been so desperate, so bleak for so many years that he was literally at the point of suicide. And so in that sense by Shakespeare coming along, presenting something positive in his life for maybe the first time, giving him a new direction, it did literally keep him from taking his own life.”
Read more. [Image: AP]


Dr. Bates was my professor at Indiana State!  woo!

girlwithalessonplan:

theatlantic:

Why Shakespeare Belongs in Prison

It’s his 450th birthday, and The Bard has never appealed to a wider or more diverse audience. American higher-ed English departments may be teaching him less than they used to, but the Internet and modern film and TV interpretations have helped democratize appreciation of his works around the world. That’s only fitting: In Shakespeare’s era, the royalty in attendance at his productions was joined by crowds of commoners called “groundlings” and “stinkards” who paid a penny to stand in the pit, sweltering in the heat, while even more milled about outside. 

There’s one “commoner” population to whom Shakespeare can hold special significance: convicts. Recent decades have seen a proliferation of programs in prisons, jails, and juvenile detention centers meant to introduce the accused to works found in the Folios and Quartos. While arts outreach efforts in correctional environments are nothing new, any diehard Shakespearean might recognize how his works appeal uniquely to the criminally accused, one of society’s most marginalized populations.

Laura Bates, author of Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary With the Bard, described teaching the plays in a super-max facility housing the most violent criminals in the system in an interview last year with NPR. The book’s title comes from the words of one inmate, convicted of murder as a teenager and placed in solitary confinement for years.

“The day that I came knocking on his cell door,” Bates explained, “his life had been so desperate, so bleak for so many years that he was literally at the point of suicide. And so in that sense by Shakespeare coming along, presenting something positive in his life for maybe the first time, giving him a new direction, it did literally keep him from taking his own life.”

Read more. [Image: AP]

Dr. Bates was my professor at Indiana State!  woo!

nprbooks:

It’s William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! (Well, OK, no one knows the exact day he was born, but devotees have adopted April 23 as the day to celebrate, so we will too.)
To mark the occasion, here are three random things you may not have known about the Bard:
What Do Jay Z And Shakespeare Have In Common? Swagger: As with so many other famous words and phrases, Shakespeare was the first to use “swagger.”
Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder: Research suggests that he was prosecuted for evading taxes and for hoarding grain during a famine and then reselling it at inflated prices. 
Shakespeare’s Accent: How Did The Bard Really Sound?: A little more Edinburgh — and sometimes even more Appalachia — than you might expect. 
HBD, Will!
-Nicole
gif via giphy

nprbooks:

It’s William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! (Well, OK, no one knows the exact day he was born, but devotees have adopted April 23 as the day to celebrate, so we will too.)

To mark the occasion, here are three random things you may not have known about the Bard:

HBD, Will!

-Nicole

gif via giphy

oupacademic:

As we celebrate Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, people offer many different reasons why theaters and readers all over the world still perform his plays. For the English-speaking world, of course, they have great linguistic pyrotechnics as well as importance as part of tradition. But another reason why the plays’ appeal keeps spreading is the extent to which they dramatize issues still important today.
Our world of frequent mobility and cross-cultural encounters produces conflicts that we can often see mirrored in Shakespeare’s plays. Many of Shakespeare’s characters move between inside and outside—begin with acceptance and end outside the play’s community, reverse the trajectory, or move back and forth many times. Lear is an omnipotent king at the beginning of his play, but soon he is out of that role, and soon after that he is out of a home. Malvolio begins as Olivia’s right hand man, though the rest of her court dislikes him,  but after he starts to woo her she is convinced he has gone mad.
Shakespeare often shows mockery or hatred of difference, but he also shows admiration, fascination, and sympathy for it—consider Antony’s attitude to Cleopatra and Desdemona’s to Othello. The plays show vividly scenes in which one character is mocked by a group, as when the Merry Wives make fun of Falstaff; scenes where an outsider is welcomed, as Orlando is to the Forest of Arden; and scenes where one character strategizes to push another outside, as Iago does to both Cassio and Desdemona. Sometimes outsider characters are interesting because they are so threatening, like Richard III, but usually their threatening moments are juxtaposed with moments that emphasize their human needs—like Shylock, they ask, “If you prick us, do we not bleed?”
Often a play juxtaposes several different kinds of relative outsiders, as we see Shylock’s difference as a Jew in some ways contrasted and in some ways paralleled with Antonio’s temperamental and class difference and Portia’s gender difference. When such outsiders conflict with each other, the audience may divide in its sympathy, but individuals in the audience or the reading public may also change their attitudes as they see one character after another go too far. These are the sort of conflicts that promote both disagreement and engagement—from the arguments of friends after seeing a play to the ongoing conversation of literary critics to the attempts of performers, directors and filmmakers to realize their own visions. These conversations, some of which probably  began after Shakespeare’s early plays in the 1590s, show no signs of stopping soon. 

Marianne Novy, author of Shakespeare and Outsiders (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Image credit: King Lear, by William Shakespeare. Billy Rose Theatre Collection photograph file / Productions / King Lear, by William Shakespeare. The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts / Billy Rose Theatre Division. Digital ID: th-26711. New York Public Library

oupacademic:

As we celebrate Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, people offer many different reasons why theaters and readers all over the world still perform his plays. For the English-speaking world, of course, they have great linguistic pyrotechnics as well as importance as part of tradition. But another reason why the plays’ appeal keeps spreading is the extent to which they dramatize issues still important today.

Our world of frequent mobility and cross-cultural encounters produces conflicts that we can often see mirrored in Shakespeare’s plays. Many of Shakespeare’s characters move between inside and outside—begin with acceptance and end outside the play’s community, reverse the trajectory, or move back and forth many times. Lear is an omnipotent king at the beginning of his play, but soon he is out of that role, and soon after that he is out of a home. Malvolio begins as Olivia’s right hand man, though the rest of her court dislikes him,  but after he starts to woo her she is convinced he has gone mad.

Shakespeare often shows mockery or hatred of difference, but he also shows admiration, fascination, and sympathy for it—consider Antony’s attitude to Cleopatra and Desdemona’s to Othello. The plays show vividly scenes in which one character is mocked by a group, as when the Merry Wives make fun of Falstaff; scenes where an outsider is welcomed, as Orlando is to the Forest of Arden; and scenes where one character strategizes to push another outside, as Iago does to both Cassio and Desdemona. Sometimes outsider characters are interesting because they are so threatening, like Richard III, but usually their threatening moments are juxtaposed with moments that emphasize their human needs—like Shylock, they ask, “If you prick us, do we not bleed?”

Often a play juxtaposes several different kinds of relative outsiders, as we see Shylock’s difference as a Jew in some ways contrasted and in some ways paralleled with Antonio’s temperamental and class difference and Portia’s gender difference. When such outsiders conflict with each other, the audience may divide in its sympathy, but individuals in the audience or the reading public may also change their attitudes as they see one character after another go too far. These are the sort of conflicts that promote both disagreement and engagement—from the arguments of friends after seeing a play to the ongoing conversation of literary critics to the attempts of performers, directors and filmmakers to realize their own visions. These conversations, some of which probably  began after Shakespeare’s early plays in the 1590s, show no signs of stopping soon. 

Marianne Novy, author of Shakespeare and Outsiders (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Image credit: King Lear, by William Shakespeare. Billy Rose Theatre Collection photograph file / Productions / King Lear, by William Shakespeare. The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts / Billy Rose Theatre Division. Digital ID: th-26711. New York Public Library